Skip to Content
Project overview
  • Lead Organisation

    Almond Board of Australia Inc

    Location

    Berri, South Australia

    ARENA Program

    Emerging Renewables Program

  • Start Date

    June 2012

    Status

    Past

  • Project Partners
    GreenFusion, Green Ochre, EconSearch
    This bioenergy project was completed on 19 July 2013.

Summary

The Generating Renewable Energy from Almond Waste project analysed the commercial viability of generating renewable energy from almond waste.

Key results

The project found that it could be affordable to use waste hull and shell to produce energy for almond production, but only when the energy solution is tailored to each production site by taking into account site-specific factors such as energy efficiency, energy demand, and the value placed on energy production by-products.

Last updated
24 January 2022

Need

Almond production requires large amounts of electricity, particularly in summer months for irrigation and during the harvest period for hulling and shelling.

The increased costs arising from greater electricity use can be reduced somewhat by using more energy efficient equipment. Renewable energy produced from almond waste could also reduce electricity costs if found to be viable and affordable.

Project innovation

The Generating Renewable Energy from Almond Waste project analysed the commercial viability of producing energy from its waste.

In doing so it mapped the industry’s energy use and carbon footprint, as well as identifying technology options for converting woody waste into renewable energy.

While several technologies are available, the project focussed on the use of gasification to convert waste hull and shell into electricity and heat.

Benefit

The project helped the production industry to not only understand its energy requirements and carbon footprint but also the extent to which it could affordably reduce both by moving to the use of renewable energy based on almond waste.

Read more about bioenergy / energy from waste.

Last updated 24 January 2022
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Back to top