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Project overview
  • Lead Organisation

    Australian National University (ANU)

    Location

    Australian Capital Territory

    ARENA Program

    Emerging Renewables Program

  • Start Date

    March 2012

    Status

    Past

  • Project Partners
    None
    This solar PV project was completed on 31 August 2014.

Summary

The Local Doping Using Laser Chemical Processing Technology project further developed a novel doping method called Laser Chemical Processing (LCP) so it can be used in the production of high efficiency, low cost cells.

Key results

The highlights of the project included:

  • achievement of very narrow laser beams and, consequently, very narrow laser opened and doped contact regions, with excellent robustness (based on the results obtained at ANU to date) and height tolerance (the beam size is not very sensitive to substrate height)
  • demonstration of high cell efficiencies above 20% even with a very high scan speed of 200mm/s.

Together these results represent a significant step forward for Laser Chemical Processing (LCP) technology, demonstrating significant advantages over other patterning technologies.

A major difficulty encountered in the project was the relative immaturity of LCP technology, which is a particular challenge as the technology combines complex optics with wet processing. Early on there were significant problems with an essential component of the system (the optical head) which caused significant delays due to the time taken to identify the problem prior to ordering and receiving replacement components.

Need

In silicon-based solar cell production, other elements (called dopants) can be added to the silicon to change its electrical properties in a process called doping.

The creation of local, highly doped regions can be used to produce high efficiency silicon solar cell structures.

Project innovation

The Local Doping Using Laser Chemical Processing Technology project further developed a novel doping method called Laser Chemical Processing (LCP) so it can be used in the production of high efficiency, low cost cells.

The LCP technology will be used to create improved contacts on silicon solar cells, thereby increasing the efficiency and decreasing the manufacturing costs of the cells.

Research during the project included the development of high-quality, targeted (localised) doping of silicon, demonstration of at least 20% efficient solar cells with LCP doping on the front side, and demonstration of front and rear LCP doped cells with efficiency of at least 20%.

Benefit

Successful outcomes from this project will significantly accelerate commercial application of LCP technology.

Read more about solar PV.

Last updated
29 January 2021
Last updated 29 January 2021
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