Skip to Content
Project overview
  • Lead Organisation

    RayGen Resources Pty Ltd

    Location

    Newbridge, New South Wales

    ARENA Program

    Australian Solar Institute

  • Start Date

    May 2012

    Status

    Past

  • Project Partners
    None
    This solar project was completed on 24 August 2015.

Summary

This project demonstrated the world’s first pre-commercial pilot of a central receiver system that uses solar photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion.

Need

The combination of high efficiency solar cells with a low cost method of collecting and concentrating sunlight could significantly reduce the cost of solar-based electricity.

Project innovation

This project demonstrated the world’s first pre-commercial pilot of a central receiver system that uses solar photovoltaic (PV) energy conversion.

A 200 kilowatt commercial scale pilot plant was constructed using RayGen’s new central receiver concentrator photovoltaic (CSPV) technology.

The CSPV technology employs an ultra efficient concentrated photovoltaic (CPV) receiver combined with an optimised heliostat collector field (an array of sun-tracking mirrors). In this system the heliostats concentrate sunlight onto the photovoltaic cells in the central receiver, which is located at the top of a mast alongside the heliostat field. By using large arrays of inexpensive mirrors, the CSPV technology can sidestep cost issues facing other solar technologies and therefore significantly reduce the cost of large scale solar energy.

The pilot plant providing performance data that can be used for the development of a commercial scale CSPV unit including efficiency, long term reliability and operations and maintenance data.

Completion of the project has placed RayGen in a position where it has developed and demonstrated the essential CSPV technology, processes and knowledge base to enable a successful commercialisation phase.

Last updated
29 January 2021

Benefit

The project was a key step toward reducing the cost of commercial concentrating solar power to the point where it can compete with traditional carbon-based energy without subsidies.

Last updated 29 January 2021
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
Back to top