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Solar energy

Manufacturing of Printed Perovskite PV Modules

  • $3.31m

    ARENA Funding

  • $6.82m

    Total Project Value

  • Project basics

    ARENA Program

    Research and development

    Lead Organisation

    CSIRO

    Start Date

    Jan 2018

    Project Partners

    Monash University, University of New South Wales, University of Cambridge

    Location

    Victoria

    Status

    Current

Project Basics

ARENA Program

Research and development

Lead Organisation

CSIRO

Start Date

Jan 2018

Project Partners

Monash University, University of New South Wales, University of Cambridge

Location

Victoria

Status

Current

Summary

Perovskite PV (PPV) is a next-generation solar technology that has demonstrated promising performance in the laboratory. This project will translate these laboratory-scale outcomes to flexible, efficient and stable large-area PPV modules. By adopting industry-relevant approaches to materials and manufacture, the project will accelerate progress of this technology towards commercialisation.

How the project works

PPV devices consist of several layers including the photo-active perovskite layer as well as other layers for transporting and collecting the charge generated.

In order to translate the high-performance of laboratory-scale devices to large-area flexible modules, each of these layers must be optimised for fabrication using scalable manufacturing methods.

In this project, each layer will be optimised for roll-to-roll printing in air, a low-cost process widely used in commercial printing.

New materials, ink formulations and packaging methods will be developed and these will be tested against benchmarks for efficiency, durability and cost.

Area of innovation

The key innovation in this project is translation of PPV technology to an industrial scale using low-cost manufacturing methods.

The high efficiencies for PPV reported thus far are for laboratory-scale devices fabricated without concern for scalability or industrial compatibility.

This project will use roll-to-roll slot-die coating, a low-cost fabrication process that can be translated to industrial scales.

By developing new materials and ink formulations for processing at moderate temperatures in air, the costs of manufacture will be further reduced.

Benefit

Using low-cost materials and manufacturing methods, flexible PPV modules are a path to low-cost solar products including new applications in unconventional solar markets.

In particular, the high power-to-weight ratio expected from flexible PPV will make them an attractive option for remote and mobile applications.

The project reduces the risk to industry by bridging the gap between laboratory-based results and commercial deployment. It places Australia at the forefront of commercialising PPV technologies, encouraging the creation of a new solar manufacturing industry in Australia.

Contact information

Dr Fiona Scholes

fiona.scholes@csiro.au